Treating Allergic Reactions

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Overview Of Allergic Reactions

  • Some individuals are very allergic to certain foods, substances and medicines, or venom resulting from a sting or bite. An allergic response can be extremely severe, and can result in death.
  • Peanuts in any form are the most common food item that can result in a severe allergic response in some people.
  • Many kids are sensitive to peanuts; so parents and teachers need to make sure that there is no interaction – e.g. by eating a friends lunch. These severe reactions are identified as anaphylactic shock. The response might differ from a body rash and wheezing, to fainting and even death.

Symptoms And Signs 

Peanuts in any form are the most common food item that can result in a severe allergic response in some people. Many kids are sensitive to peanuts; so parents and teachers need to make sure that there is no interaction – e.g. by eating a friends lunch. These severe reactions are identified as anaphylactic shock. The response might differ from a body rash and wheezing, to fainting and even death.

Peanuts in any form are the most common food item that can result in a severe allergic response in some people.
Many kids are sensitive to peanuts; so parents and teachers need to make sure that there is no interaction – e.g. by eating a friends lunch. These severe reactions are identified as anaphylactic shock. The response might differ from a body rash and wheezing, to fainting and even death.

  • Inflammation of the face, particularly around the mouth and throat.
  • Soreness of the skin or an irritated rash over the torso and back.
  • Queasiness and/or nausea.
  • Breathing trouble comparable to an asthma attack.
  • Faintness, weakness or dizziness.
  • Diarrhea.

How You Can Help

  1. Stay with the casualty and ensure they rest.
  • If an allergic response is occurring, the casualty might unexpectedly collapse and has to be managed as an unconscious casualty. CPR might be necessary.
  • Relaxation can slow the reaction and allow time for the paramedics to arrive.
  • Let the casualty rest in a position that is comfortable. Every so often the casualty will want to sit up if there are respiratory problems.

Call for the paramedics: if the casualty is having trouble breathing; or if the casualty is very ill.

  1. Offer any relevant treatment or medication.
  • Certain allergic patients have prescribed tablets with them or a vaccination of adrenaline. If needed, help the casualty find and manage their prescribed dosage of medication.
  • If the patient is too ill to control their own adrenaline, another individual should do this for them. This should be done straight away if an allergic response is emerging.
  1. If the reaction follows direct contact with a chemical.
  • Rinse the affected area carefully with lots of water.
  1. Watch the casualty carefully.
  • While waiting for the paramedics to come, watch the casualty carefully for any change in their condition.
  • If the casualty becomes unconscious, place them on their side.
  • Be willing to begin CPR if the casualty stops breathing.

Related Video on Allergic Reactions

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  • All standardfirstaidtraining.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.