How to treat wrist pain

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Wrist pain is caused by injuries resulting from sprains and fractures. Wrist pain can also be triggered by some long-term problems like a repetitive stress, arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome.

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Symptoms

  • There are tingling and numbing sensations in the hand and arms similar to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • When the nerves in the wrist are damaged they cause pain called neuropathic pain. The pain can be mild, dull aching to a severe type of pain. Pain in the wrist can be caused by some chronic conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis and nerve palsy.
  • Nerves found in the arm provide strength and coordination to the muscles found in the forearm and hand. When the nerve passes through the wrist, they can be damaged and will cause weak hands and fingers as evident with difficulty in gripping objects by the use of the fingers or pinching object with the fingers. There is also loss of coordination and agility when performing activities with the use of hands and fingers.
Wrist pain

There are tingling and numbing sensations in the hand and arms similar to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Causes

  • Pain in the wrist can be caused by sprain when one or more ligaments in the wrist are overstretched which are common in athletes.
  • Fracture or breaks in the bones of the arms or wrist can cause pain.
  • Pain in the wrist can be caused by carpal tunnel syndrome which it compresses the median nerve found inside the wrist. The pain spreads to the thumb and other fingers, except the little finger.
  • Tendonitis can also cause pain when a tendon or the sheath found inside the forearm or the wrist is inflamed. This happens due to repetitive straining of the hand when playing tennis and typing. It causes severe pain in the hands and will spread up to the elbow.
  • Arthritis can also cause pain in the wrist and the lower forearm. Rheumatoid arthritis will also develop when the immune system of the body will attack its own tissues in the wrist and will cause tenderness, swelling and pain that can be constant and intermittent.
  • Ganglion cysts can happen in the wrist which is caused by a leak from the tissues that are filled with fluid found between the wrist joints or from the tendons sheaths in the area.

Treatment and home remedies

  • The individual should avoid all physical activities that involve using the wrist. A wrist brace should be worn in order to immobilize the wrist joints.
  • Take a pain medication such as ibuprofen or naproxen every 4 to 6 hours until pain and inflammation subsides.
  • Put an ice pack or put inside a hand towel and strap on the wrist so that it compresses directly the wrist. Leave the compress on the wrist for 15 to 20 minutes and elevate it higher than the heart to control inflammation and pain. You can learn more about ice therapy but enrolling in a first aid class
  • Use a heating pad for several times when the inflammation and pain subsides. Gently massage the wrist for 5 minutes before and after using the heat treatment.
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  • All standardfirstaidtraining.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.